Rate this article and enter to win

Are you so busy that it feels like there’s barely time for eating, let alone planning meals and cooking? Kristan Y., a student at the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls, knows this well. With a full school schedule and multiple family commitments, she usually goes to the grocery store only once or twice a month. “The challenge of cooking as a student is finding time [in] my schedule and my family’s, too,” she says.

When she does find time, Kristan focuses on easy meals by using a slow cooker. She explains, “The food will cook while I am [at school].” Shaun M., a student at Century College in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, uses the little cooking time he has to create multiple servings of a meal. “I make more than I need so I can live off of that for a few days,” he says.

According to a recent Student Health 101 survey, 95 percent of respondents believe they would save money if they cooked for themselves more often. By creating a meal plan, you’ll be able to buy nutritious, affordable ingredients and prepare meals in a timely way. Here’s how, including detailed shopping lists and recipes.

Plan Ahead

When choosing meals, ingredients, and menus, consider four factors:

  • Nutritional value
  • Ease of preparation
  • Price
  • Your tastes!

You can build most meals with basic ingredients like beans, nuts, whole grains, and fresh fruits and vegetables–prepared in simple sauces or combined with spices that add flavor and texture. You can also add some lean meat, tofu, and dairy products for variety and extra nutrition.

Efficient Shopping
Spend an hour or so on the Internet looking for recipes that pique your palate. Try to find dishes that use similar ingredients so you can buy a container of something and know you’ll use it up. This also makes it easy to tweak leftovers to create “new” meals.

Next, develop your shopping list. Check your cabinets and fridge to see what you already have on hand. Sandesh T., a student at Montgomery College in Maryland, says, “I try to plan my meals around the items I already have. It helps me [reduce] my grocery expenses.”

Here are more prep steps:

Make a list of basics. Some items are good to always have handy. If you don’t have them, consider adding some to your shopping list.

  • Whole rolled or steel-cut oats
  • Whole-wheat tortillas
  • Brown rice
  • Pasta and/or other whole grains
  • Whole-grain pretzels or crackers
  • Apples, bananas, and other fruits that don’t perish easily
  • Bagged spinach leaves
  • Whole or peeled “baby” carrots
  • Packages of frozen broccoli florets or other vegetables (without sauce or seasonings)
  • Peanut or other nut butter
  • Dairy or non-dairy milk (You can buy these in packages that don’t require refrigeration.)
  • Olive oil and reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • Honey
  • Basic spices such as salt, pepper, garlic powder, oregano, cumin, and cinnamon

Search for sales. Most grocery stores have virtual fliers where shoppers can check out upcoming sales and print coupons.

Organize your list. Group the ingredients on your list based on where they are in the store. For example, produce, dairy, frozen food, bread products, etc. Many nutritionists also recommend sticking to the perimeter of the store. This is where you’ll find fresh foods like produce, dairy, meat, and the bakery. The aisles (and especially the areas featuring sale items) have the more processed foods.

Using your shopping list will also reduce your temptation to spend extra money or buy less nutritious treats. Kristan says, “[Using my list] helps me only buy things that I really need.” But don’t forget to include something sweet on your menu!

Keep an open mind. You may not be able to find exact ingredients, so consider alternatives. For example, if you need black beans but pintos are on sale, go for those instead.

Printable sample shopping list

A Week of Meals

Consider preparing some meals with friends or family members. You can buy ingredients in bulk to share or rotate responsibility for cooking. This can cut down on time. Plus, taking a break to cook is a nice respite from studying. As Shaun points out, “If you have someone helping you [cook], it makes it a lot easier and more enjoyable.”

Once you have your supplies, figure out if you want to cook most of your meals at the beginning of the week, or daily. For example, a big pot of soup can be frozen in portions and heated for lunch on a few days. Or, you can cook a whole pound of pasta at once but refrigerate it in smaller portions. (If you do this, consider undercooking the pasta by a minute or so. This way, when you reheat, it won’t turn to mush.)

When scheduling your meals, also think about how fresh the ingredients need to be. For example, berries and some vegetables will deteriorate within a few days, so salads and fresh fruits are best to eat earlier in the week. Also consider which foods will multitask. Consider eating meals with those ingredients on consecutive days so they stay fresh once opened.

Here are some menu ideas that use a handful of ingredients in a variety of ways. They are suited for vegetarians, and you can substitute or add lean meats if you’d like.

Breakfasts

  • Easy French toast
  • Huevos Rancheros (Mexican-style eggs)
  • Oatmeal with berries
  •  “Baked” apple and whole-grain toast
  • Overnight oatmeal

Lunches

  • Vegetable soup with whole-grain toast and nut butter
  • Kitchen-sink salad
  • Grilled cheese sandwich and soup and/or salad
  • Hummus and veggie plate
  • Nut butter sandwich with fruit and yogurt
  • Traditional quesadilla

Dinners

  • Steamed veggie and rice plate
  • Rice salad
  • Bean burritos and salad
  • Pesto pasta and veggies
  • Pasta salad with hummus
  • Seasoned egg and veggie scramble
  •  “Fried” rice

Snacks and Desserts

  • Nut butter on carrots, celery, and/or apple slices
  • Vegetables with tangy yogurt dip
  • Nut butter and banana quesadilla with yogurt and honey
  • Sweet rice “pudding”
  • Quesadilla “cookies”

Planning and eating healthy meals doesn’t have to be expensive, time-consuming, or intimidating.

By shopping ahead, you can plan a variety of easy, nutritious, budget-friendly meals. Preparing and eating them with others can add to your enjoyment.

Print out these recipes for breakfast

Print out these recipes for lunch

Print out these recipes for dinner

Print out these recipes for snacks and desserts

Take Action!

  • When planning meals, consider a balance of nutrition over the course of the week.
  • Look for recipes that use a handful of ingredients in a variety of ways.
  • Focus on items that are affordable, simple, easy to prepare, and nutritionally rich.
  • Plan to shop for, prepare, and eat some meals with others–to save time and money.
  • Vary recipes based on your tastes and nutritional needs.
  • Freeze extra portions for days when there’s no time to cook.

Your video is loading

You must enter your name, email, and phone number so we can contact you if you're the winner of this month's drawing.
Your data will never be shared or sold to outside parties. View our Privacy Policy.

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us More
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:



HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?

First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:





Get help or find out more